Second stimulus checks: Here’s where we stand as a new week begins

U.S. & World

President Donald Trump’s name appears on the coronavirus economic assistance checks that were sent to citizens across the country in April. The initial 88 million payments totaling nearly $158 billion were sent by the Treasury Department as most of the country remained under stay-at-home orders due to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON (NEXSTAR) — With just 8 days until the general election, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she’s not giving up on passing another coronavirus relief economic package before November 3.

At issue is a huge virus relief bill that would send another $1,200 direct payment to most Americans, restart bonus unemployment benefits, fund additional testing and vaccines, provide aid to schools and allocate money to state and local governments, a Democratic priority.

Pelosi says she sent the administration a list of concerns on Friday and she is told that she’ll have answers on Monday.

Pelosi says she wants a relief bill that is predicated on steps that science dictates should be taken to deal with the coronavirus, and “if we don’t, we’re just giving money to the president to spend any way he wants and that has not been in furtherance of crushing the virus.”

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows said Sunday the administration has made many offers, but Pelosi “continues to move the goalposts.”

Meadows noted the relief bill being negotiated would cost about $1.9 trillion. Pelosi is hoping for a $2.2 trillion package. Meadows says he has a commitment from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to bring a bill to the floor if negotiations with Pelosi conclude successfully.

On Friday, Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, the chief negotiator for the GOP, said significant differences remain between Republican and Democratic leadership and noted Pelosi had “dug in.”

During Thursday night’s debate, President Donald Trump blamed Pelosi for the fact no deal has been reached saying she doesn’t want to do anything that would help him.

Democratic candidate Joe Biden raised his voice as he reminded viewers of Thursday’s presidential debate that the Democratic-controlled House passed a relief bill months ago. He asked Trump why he isn’t talking to his “Republican friends” about a deal.

A $1.8 trillion rescue plan in March passed virtually unanimously. The Pelosi-pushed package today is even larger but has run into resolute opposition from Republicans. Taking care of the issue would clear the decks for a fresh start on the congressional agenda next year.

Senate Democrats blocked a Senate GOP plan that McConnell brought to a vote Wednesday. The measure contained more than $100 billion for schools, a $300 per week supplemental unemployment insurance benefit, and more subsidies for businesses especially hard hit by pandemic-related downturns and closures. It did not include the $1,200 direct payments that are so important to Trump.

Trump says that if he wins reelection, aid will flow immediately. If he loses, it’s unclear whether his enthusiasm for delivering it will be as strong.

“I’m never very optimistic about the lame duck and I’ve never been surprised,” said Sen. Roy Blunt, R-Mo. “You don’t get near as much done as you think you’re going to get done.”

Those Republicans willing to speculate about a Trump loss say not to expect much, either.

“I think Democrats would want to wait until the new president is sworn in and do it then and I think Republicans probably would say … the economy’s taking care of it,” said Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-Iowa.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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