“I am sorry”: Zuckerberg faces congressional inquisition

U.S. & World
Facebook Privacy Scandal Congress_1523371007452

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, center, walks between meetings with senators on Capitol Hill, Monday, April 9, 2018, in Washington. Zuckerberg will testify Tuesday before a joint hearing of the Commerce and Judiciary Committees about the use of Facebook data to target American voters in the 2016 election. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg is assuring lawmakers he has learned a lot since starting the social network in his Harvard dorm room 14 years ago.

The roughly 2.2 billion people now using Facebook can only hope Zuckerberg’s views on personal privacy have changed.

Not long after Zuckerberg started Facebook while he was still 19 years old, he mocked the people entrusting him with their emails, pictures and other sensitive information while instant messaging with a friend. The exchange was obtained and published in 2010 by Business Insider.

After his friends asked him how he obtained so much information about 4,000 people, Zuckerberg said they “trust me” and then described people as “dumb” for doing it, punctuated with a profanity.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the remarks in a 2010 interview with “The New Yorker” and said he had “learned and grown a lot.”

Not long after Zuckerberg started Facebook while he was still 19 years old, he mocked the people entrusting him with their emails, pictures and other sensitive information while instant messaging with a friend. The exchange was obtained and published in 2010 by Business Insider.

After his friends asked him how he obtained so much information about 4,000 people, Zuckerberg said they “trust me” and then described people as “dumb” for doing it, punctuated with a profanity.

Zuckerberg later apologized for the remarks in a 2010 interview with “The New Yorker” and said he had “learned and grown a lot.”

Zuckerberg visited with senators in closed-door meetings Monday, previewing the public apology he plans to give Congress on Tuesday after revelations that Cambridge Analytica, a data-mining firm affiliated with Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, gathered personal information from 87 million users to try to influence elections.

He’s apologized many times already, to users and the public, but it is the first time in his career that he has gone before Congress. Zuckerberg will testify before a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees on Tuesday and before a House panel on Wednesday.

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